[Meg Clothier] ✓ The Empress [sewing PDF] Ebook Epub Download ↠´ formresponse.co.uk

[Meg Clothier] ✓ The Empress [sewing PDF] Ebook Epub Download ↠´ I started out with such high hopes for this book The time period is such a unique one, and any historical fiction that s about an obscure female figure makes me a happy camper However, ultimately, I was disappointed by this work Not a great introduction to this author.
She got the time period down, at least Her effort towards historical research and getting the details right show through She chose a setting and historical period ripe with change and intrigue The Byzantine Empire is on the verge of massive change, facing vast armies without and decay breakdown within The tale of this young girl thrown into this maelstrom of backstabbing and danger was enough to keep me reading The author knows how to bring the Fourth Crusade and an empire in flux to vivid life.
I m a bit ambivalent on the main character At least I can say that she s brave with all she faces, she can think on her feet sometimes, and is able to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances However, often than not, she is of a reactionary character rather than one who actually takes action She goes along with the events as they present without taking many actions to change outcomes There are a few times where she takes action Andronkis comes to mind , but the instances are too few to save her as a good main character.
The less said about the love between Agnes and Theo, the better There is absolutely no chemistry between these two, except for friction Any romantic connection has as much chemistry as distilled water, nothing They have very few scenes together, and the ones they do have they are usually fighting in More arguments happen than actual love connections It makes any dramatic tension that might have resulted from the characters striving for each other and being motivated by each other disappear.
Overall, I was disappointed by this work The author did a good job in setting and story, but her characters and their relationships need some work There are a few good points but not enough to save that aspect of the story For a book this size, there isn t enough substance to make it a worthwhile read If you re looking for a rare time period or murky female historical figure, then maybe look this one up Otherwise, I d move along.
Constantinople, Princess Agnes Of France Is Thirteen When She Marries The Heir To Byzantium, An Empire Unmatched In Wealth, Power And GlamourBut Once She Sets Foot In The Queen Of Cities, A Decadent World Where Dazzling Luxury Masks Unspeakable Cruelty, She Realises That Her Husband Is A Deluded Mother S Boy With Mighty Enemies And Treacherous AlliesWelcome To The CityAs Emperors Rise And Fall, Agnes Learns To Play The City S Game Until She Falls For A Handsome Rebel And Finds That Love Is The Most Perilous Game Of AllGlittering Parties In Marble Palaces Soon Give Way To Bloody Revolution, Shipwreck And Exile And Agnes Discovers There Is No Limit To What She Will Do To SurviveA World In FlamesBut Only When Crusading Knights From Her Homeland Attack The City, Does She Finally Understand What Is Truly Worth Fighting For This book has rave reviews on but I have only given it two stars I like her style of writing, it s very descriptive, but I really struggled to keep up with the plot.
I was thrilled to read about the 12th and 13th centuries in Byzantine history that I didn t know much about Until the last section the novel was disappointing I was glad to read later most of the main characters really lived and went through such upheavals that the author described, although Agnes aka Empress Anna and Theo Branas were footnotes to history The author seemed to really incorporate history, from the marriage of Agnes of France to the boy emperor of Constantinople, the mama s boy Alexios II Komnenos, through her learning to cope with the duplicitous Byzantine court, through the reigns of seven emperors and ending with the 4th Crusade, Sack of Constantinople and travails of Agnes 1204.
I didn t feel the love interest between Agnes and Theo really caught fire until the last section during the reign of Murzuphlus Alexios again V Doukas he was always away at war and when they were together, all they did was argue I don t think the author tampered too much with history but I feel she changed the ages of some of the people One thing I found the Byzantines weren t terribly original in naming their children I couldn t count all the Alexioses no wonder their emperors all used their surnames I was glad to read something other than the hackneyed Justinian and Theodora I liked the author s touch in using the term R man, giving these people distance from classical Romans but still putting forth the idea that they were heirs of classical Romans.
Recommended.
I started out with such high hopes for this book The time period is such a unique one, and any historical fiction that s about an obscure female figure makes me a happy camper However, ultimately, I was disappointed by this work Not a great introduction to this author.
She got the time period down, at least Her effort towards historical research and getting the details right show through She chose a setting and historical period ripe with change and intrigue The Byzantine Empire is on the verge of massive change, facing vast armies without and decay breakdown within The tale of this young girl thrown into this maelstrom of backstabbing and danger was enough to keep me reading The author knows how to bring the Fourth Crusade and an empire in flux to vivid life.
I m a bit ambivalent on the main character At least I can say that she s brave with all she faces, she can think on her feet sometimes, and is able to adapt to rapidly changing circumstances However, often than not, she is of a reactionary character rather than one who actually takes action She goes along with the events as they present without taking many actions to change outcomes There are a few times where she takes action Andronkis comes to mind , but the instances are too few to save her as a good main character.
The less said about the love between Agnes and Theo, the better There is absolutely no chemistry between these two, except for friction Any romantic connection has as much chemistry as distilled water, nothing They have very few scenes together, and the ones they do have they are usually fighting in More arguments happen than actual love connections It makes any dramatic tension that might have resulted from the characters striving for each other and being motivated by each other disappear.
Overall, I was disappointed by this work The author did a good job in setting and story, but her characters and their relationships need some work There are a few good points but not enough to save that aspect of the story For a book this size, there isn t enough substance to make it a worthwhile read If you re looking for a rare time period or murky female historical figure, then maybe look this one up Otherwise, I d move along.
So often in history, women get overlooked, dismissed as if they existed solely to be married off and never did anything of note This novel tells a very different story Only 13 when the novel starts, we see French princess Agnes sent off to Constantinople, where the ruling family sees itself as heir to the Roman empire, they believe themselves the most powerful people on Earth Naturally, being so young, Agnes is nervous at first, but soon realises that she does not have to just content herself with sitting quietly in the corner Reporting an incestuous affair draws her into plots against the throne all of which she must navigate safely while trying to keep herself alive.
Part of the reason I loved this novel is that it is set in a time and period that I have almost no previous knowledge of While we re all familiar with 12th century England, 12th century Constantinople and the Eastern Roman Empire is much less famous I was able to read this book with a genuine sense of suspense because I honestly had no idea how things turned out And it is very suspenseful, eventful and detailed As unfamiliar as the era may be to us, the author is perfectly familiar with all of it Descriptions are vivid, characters are developed and sympathetic There s even a family tree included to distinguish between the various Alexios s and others medieval nobility were never very adventurous or imaginative with their names The female characters in particular are powerful, active women a far cry from the typical medieval damsels we typically get served up in other books.
It is the sort of novel that, having enjoyed it and read the Historical Notes at the back, makes me want to open up some history books and find out about the setting And want to read the author s other work I thoroughly recommend it for anyone looking for fresh historical fiction It s certainly a welcome change from yet another book about Roman centurions or the Battle of Waterloo.
So often in history, women get overlooked, dismissed as if they existed solely to be married off and never did anything of note This novel tells a very different story Only 13 when the novel starts, we see French princess Agnes sent off to Constantinople, where the ruling family sees itself as heir to the Roman empire, they believe themselves the most powerful people on Earth Naturally, being so young, Agnes is nervous at first, but soon realises that she does not have to just content herself with sitting quietly in the corner Reporting an incestuous affair draws her into plots against the throne all of which she must navigate safely while trying to keep herself alive.
Part of the reason I loved this novel is that it is set in a time and period that I have almost no previous knowledge of While we re all familiar with 12th century England, 12th century Constantinople and the Eastern Roman Empire is much less famous I was able to read this book with a genuine sense of suspense because I honestly had no idea how things turned out And it is very suspenseful, eventful and detailed As unfamiliar as the era may be to us, the author is perfectly familiar with all of it Descriptions are vivid, characters are developed and sympathetic There s even a family tree included to distinguish between the various Alexios s and others medieval nobility were never very adventurous or imaginative with their names The female characters in particular are powerful, active women a far cry from the typical medieval damsels we typically get served up in other books.
It is the sort of novel that, having enjoyed it and read the Historical Notes at the back, makes me want to open up some history books and find out about the setting And want to read the author s other work I thoroughly recommend it for anyone looking for fresh historical fiction It s certainly a welcome change from yet another book about Roman centurions or the Battle of Waterloo.
Book ReviewTitle The EmpressAuthor Meg ClothierGenre Historical Mystery War Drama RomanceRating Review The first review quote you see upon setting eyes on the UK edition of Meg Clothier s The Empress seems odd to say the least So much fun than another Boleyn book reads the chosen line from reviewer the Independent Though easy to mock, and believe me, I have, this statement does a disservice to Clothier s novel.
Set primarily in Constantinople, in the tumultuous years of the twelfth century Byzantium Empire, The Empress is one of those highly readable and engaging sweeping epics that fill bookshelves after bookshelves these days Yet for this story a fictionalised account of the days of Princess Agnes of France, who at the beginning of the book is betrothed to the Emperor s son Alexios the setting provides a distinctive edge to Clothier s tale.
The many conflicts, betrayals, loves and losses that occur in the relatively short period between the late 1100s and early thirteenth century AD are enough to bear brilliant fruit for a compelling and intriguing saga The Byzantium Empire, and Constantinople itself, are ripe sites for historical retellings and captivating tales, yet it seems that relatively speaking not many authors have attempted to do so Agnes s story allows Clothier to boldly stand out amongst the historical fiction horde.
A young French girl having just barely hit puberty, being thrust into the lion s den in a foreign land to master the art of court politics, marriage and warring lands, Agnes has a thankless task but a spirited temperament Full of guile and innate intelligence, Agnes is no maudlin heroine, or shy dormouse, or even rebellious upstart like many recent YA leads Agnes readily allows herself to give in to the lure of sitting in the lap of luxury whilst the world outside threatens to crumble to dust Agnes is no villain, simply a young woman desperate to keep her head, or accurately, to keep from being locked away in a nunnery She is a survivor, and choices she makes throughout the book may confuse readers but will not deter them from her story for long Now, don t assume the heroine here is a Katniss Everdeen esque warrior, good with a bow yet emotionally stunted, because Clothier still writes Agnes in light of a typical romantic heroine Thankfully, not one who continually bemoans her own fate however, as Agnes is clever enough to navigate the palace machinations with plucky aplomb.
The characters each shine in various ways, and the book successfully avoids the use of stock figures Well researched or not, Clothier enriches her characters with enough personality and motivations to remain interesting Even the villainous usurper Andronikos has his pleasant moments, and the feeble Alexios has his darker ones.
The Empress is of course, at its heart, a romance novel but fortunately, unlike the persistent efforts of characters in many other modern novels like this, our heroes are not similarly afflicted Yes, they have their amorous moments, but Clothier successfully avoids hitting you over the head with such mawkish nonsense, at least in the book s first half anyway Instead the novel indulges in the grimier, horrific aspects of the era, with the grisly end to one character if you really desire spoilers, head over to Wikipedia or any accurate history source to find out who I mean written in shocking, though not gratuitous, detail It s enough to make even Game of Thrones fans shudder.
Any literary lovers who get their kicks from historical epics will find in this novel a generous amount of court intrigue, fancy customs and insights into a bygone age It is a gripping read, splendidly paced, with enough bloody chaos and mayhem to avoid the trap of transforming a true tale of powerful people waging wars into the potentially soppy history of a Princess playing at being Empress.
The most interesting character is Andronikos, Agnes second husband and Byzantine Emperor 1183 85 He sounds like he had quite the interesting life full of violence and scandalous love affairs, a life that ended with a particularly nasty death not too much of a spoiler I hope I definitely want to read about him, Umberto Eco wrote a novel about him called Baudolino which I might take a look at, although the review I read of this said the novel has a strong focus on his grisly death so it might not be a book for the faint hearted Overall it was an exciting story and I was constantly keen to find out what happened next so read it pretty quickly for a fairly long book about 500 pages I liked that a historical book with a female protagonist didn t focus on romance, although Agnes does have a love affair aside from her political marriages it is not the main focus of the book, the focus is on the political shifts in power at the court and contains far violence scenes than it does moments of passion.
This book didn t shy away from the violence of the times.
Although I liked the fact the focus was on action this did mean that the characters weren t perhaps as well drawn as they could have been I didn t really feel an affinity with anyone and although I wanted to know what happened to them, didn t really care too much when people were killed off I guess that would be my main criticism I also found the dialogue quite weak and occasionally found it a bit unexpected for a historical piece, for example characters say things like you re on your own mate and the F word is used liberally and a Byzantine general is referred to by his follows as boss This may not be a valid criticism at all, how do I know people in 12th century Byzantium didn t talk like this I think it has to do with my expectations formed by being raised a diet of BBC costume dramas where everyone pre 1900 speaks in a very formal style I never thought much of historical fiction as a genre Then I saw the cover, read the synopsis and decided that I d give it a go This novel was a lot of fun I enjoyed the pacing, it moved with the events I really enjoyed Agnes as a character she was so sassy, charismatic and intelligent, I couldn t help but to want to root for her I loved the fact that she and the other characters made some really dumb decisions that seemed smart at the time The world felt quite fleshed out and it felt as if everything fit within the time period it was set in I feel as if this was a great introduction to a relatively new genre for me and I look forward to trying of it.
I enjoyed this book, particularly as I learned about an unusual period of history I didn t know about However I agree with other reviews that the characters weren t that easy to love, and the human interest wasn t really there.
want to read because of Meg s other book Really enjoyed Will read the previous one Recommend to my book group It was a good book but there were parts that just dragged along and left me forcing myself to get to the interesting pages again This book has rave reviews on but I have only given it two stars I like her style of writing, it s very descriptive, but I really struggled to keep up with the plot.